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that it would be difficult to ratify an u.n. treaty that is based on existing u.s. law. but then again you might not have met the modern republican party where ideological zealots rule. on july 26 1990, president george bush sr. signed the americans with disabilities act. the bill passed the house and the senate with only 34 legislate34legislators total opposing it. yet today 38 republican senators voted no on the u.n. treaty that would extend the ada to the rest of the world. inclusion six who had voted yay on the bill in 19 ott. this was sufficient to block it. the treaty was adopted by the united nations six years ago and has since been ratified by 126 countries, just not the united states. even a last-minute appeal by former senator bob dole himself a disabled veteran, as well as every major veterans group and even the chamber of commerce could not sway senate republicans. but this is what has become of the republican party. a party whose views often dissend to the lowest common denominator and defined by paranoid fears of the u.n. that are devoid of any fact whatsoever. so one could underst
is up and which way is down, these men have been bipartisan leaders together on this treaty. the u.n. convention on the rights of persons with disabilities has united the seemingly un-unitable. the vote was scheduled today. ratifying a treaty requires 66 yea votes. former senator bob dole was there at the senate for the occasion. in his wheelchair. the decorated wounded combat veteran, the former republican presidential nominee on the floor of the senate. he was there with his wife. so senators had to walk past him in his wheelchair on the way in to vote. and the republicans in the senate voted no. the treaty got 61 votes, but you need a super majority to ratify a treaty and only eight republicans voted for the treaty. it requires nothing of us. 38 republicans voted no. so it failed. forget republican president, john mccain, war hero, bob dole in his wheelchair in the senate, forget our wounded veterans in their wheelchairs, forget them all. republicans are going with rick santorum and the black helicopter theory instead. now this year in 2012. they did that today. amazing. joining u
? >> the world is waiting for more attention to the u.n. convention against corruption. that means ratification. it is not ok that germany has not ratified this treaty. it is important to look at some of the other activities that politicians and those in the justice system are involved in. it is important to know about that in terms of complex of interest that may emerge in their public sector -- of conflict of interest that may emerge in their public-sector work. >> eu anti-trust regulators have imposed fines on alleged cartel of -- on an alleged cartel of electronics companies. >> tv sets with cathode ray tubes are not new anymore. the past has come back to haunt some of the electronics industry's biggest names, samsung, lg, and philips among those found guilty of price- fixing. the eu says the pushed up prices for consumers by fixing the prices. >> these tubes accounted for 50% to 70% of the prices of the screen. this gives an indication of the serious harm. >> the eu noted that executives filled all the stereotypes of cartel behavior. >> this is why they did everything they could to hide it
with her counterpart, russian minister lab rov and a u.n. special envoy on the side of an international security conference she is taking part in. russia is one of syria's main allies but have opposed and opposed any u.n. measures against him up until this point. if clinton can submit russian support the u.n. security council might be able to pass a sanctions resolution against the syrian government particularly because of the chemical weapons issue. on wednesday in brussels clinton also renewed support for the syrian opposition. is there an exit strategy for assad? though the u.n. secretary of general said yesterday the world should not let him seek asylum senator kerry told andrea mitchell he disagrees. >> it's in our security interests to be able to get a transition that is controlled and that is negotiated and that is orderly because the alternative to that is you could have 200,000, 500,000 people killed. >> if syria crosses the red line in chemical weapons what will the u.s. do? middle east expert jeffrey goldberg joins us on the escalating violence across the region in a scoop th
thoughts on this convention. i -- it seems as if most of the 250eu78times when the u.n. treas come up, i have been opposed to them. my concern has always been that of sovereign at this moment so. i do oppose the crpd because i think does impinge upon our sovereignty, establishing an unelected united nations body called the committee on the rights of persons with disabilities in the conference of state parties. these unelected bureaucratic bodies would implement the treaty and pass so-called recommendations that would be -- that would be forced upon the united nations and the u.s. as if the u.s. senior senator a signatory. we already have the 190 act. we went through that a few years ago. i was here at that time. it is considered to be the gold standard for the disabled. we don't need the united nations bureaucrats changing it in our country in the name of worldwide application. while the obama administration afirst that no changes to -- affirms that no changes to the federal or state law will be necessary, if the crpd is ratified, the crpd can be amended. the senator from indiana talked
been contaminated. >> reporter: experts believe cholera was brought here by u.n. peacekeepers. untreated sewage from this base flowed into a tributary of the river, the major source of water for both washing and drinking. cholera is spread by fecal-oral contact. two years on 200,000 patients have been sickened, 750 d 7,500 have died from diarrhea and fluid loss. each flood brings more contaminated water, more cases. the epidemic prompted massive relief efforts and public campaigns. on the streets and in classrooms promoting hygiene and sanitation. fatalities have dropped from 10% of cases early on to about 1%. still, 600 people have died from cholera this year. many in remote areas even those unaffected by floods. there's now plenty of awareness of cholera in haiti. the biggest challenge for people today is distance. as the epidemic subsided over the last few months many treatment centers have been closed in the remote areas. getting to plays that remain open is a huge challenge that can take hours. and that delay can be fatal. this man, a 27-year-old mother of three, will lik
. >> mr. president, i rise in opposition to the ratification of the u.n. convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. this i understand it's a sensitive topic, one about which many of my constituents on both sides of the issue have strong feelings. certainly most of us that not all of us have a family member or friend with a disability and all of us live in a society that includes the disabled is highly valued members of our communities. i've heard from advocacy groups listing of people who hope and believe that this treaty will protect disabled americans as they travel abroad in mexico about go about their lives. but i've also heard from parents of disabled children who are concerned that this treaty and adherence to the best interests of the child standard and article vii will threaten their rights as parents to determine the best education treatment and care for their disabled children. proponents of the treaty will dismiss those concerns as myth. i simply cannot support a treaty that threatens the right of parents to raise their children with the constantly made for
. the u.n. peace envoy met with u.n. and russian diplomats trying to broker a cease-fire. at the same time there is growing concern tonight over al qaeda's influence in the rebel ranks. david martin is at the pentagon. >> reporter: video said to show the aftermath of a syrian air strike provides graphic evidence of a life-and-death battle which high level diplomats say is bad and getting worse. despite its air power the assad regime appears increasingly on the defensive against rebel forces which according to israel's ambassador to the u.s. include a growing number of radical islamist. >> the jihadi presence is big and getting bigger. and the longer the conflict goes on there, the bigger it will get. >> the jihadies are an offshoot of al qaeda in iraq which ones fought a no holds bar battle against american troops. according to jeffrey white a former analyst for the defense intelligence agency, they are now turning the tide against the assad regime. >> they are very good. they give the rebels a combat edge. they are quite willing to dichlt they fight on all key fronts. they're involved in
, the foreign policy team. >> we saw this joking moment, let me replay it, a news conference to push the u.n. treaty on disabilities which -- >> which is going to -- may fail. >> which is unbelievable since america has been -- >> very surprising. >> way out front since the days of bush '41 and tom harken was the big -- >> bob dole. >> and john mccain today made a plea for bob dole who is in walter reed he wants to see this great moment, a worldwide standard, it would be good for business, but as you pointed out on the daily rundown today, the chamber of commerce supports this, selling wheelchairs -- >> around the world. >> and here, it's stalemate. it needs two-thirds, more than 60. this is a treaty. because it has u.n. attached to it -- >> going to say it's brand, it's about brand. >> at that moment with mccain and john kerry because of foreign relations issue and this is the way mccain sort of gigged john kerry and kerry teased him back. >> thank you very much, mr. secretary. >> thank you very much, mr. president. >> and there was a lot of joking after that. a lot of laughing. >> we should
, and the u.n. says aids claimed 1.7 million lives last year. the uss"enterprise" sailed through many historic moments, but today the nation's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier was taken out of active service. some 12,000 people turned out in norfolk, virginia, to say farewell. the 51-year-old warship, also known as the "big e." served in every major conflict since the cuban missile crise. straight ahead, controversy in cooperstown. baseball's steroid era comes under scrutiny. >> jarvis: they'e biggest names in baseball-- bonds, clemens, and sosa. this year all three former players are eligible for entry to the hall of fame in cooperstown, new york, but as tony guida tells us, controversy over steroids is in play. >> and bonds hits one high. >> reporter: no one in baseball history hit more home runs than barry bonds. >> he struck him out! >> no one in baseball history racked up more pitching honors than roger clemens. the two stars headline this year's ballot for the hall of fame. neither is likely to be elected, says danny knobler, a writer for cbssports.com. >> i think the overwhelming
states. >> laura: of course, not everyone sees it that way. joining me now are former u.n. ambassador to the united nations under president clinton nancy and nile at the heritage foundation. all right, nancy, let's look at your reaction. dick cheney comes out and says we are not respected and not feared. chaos everywhere. and we're not really seeing leadership from washington. what's your reaction to that? >> he is just out of touch and should take a page out of president bush's book and stay on the sidelines, write his memoirs but he is really not looking at the world as it is today. president obama has made this world safer. he has restored america's respect around the world. and it's actually teed up to have an extraordinary second term to make progress to keep us safe on a range of issues. i'm sure that's what he will do. >> laura: if you are somebody who doesn't follow things closely but you look at the images on television and syria, clashes in egypt, islamism rising through the parts of africa. it doesn't look like especially religious minorities, cause of freedom is really bei
for terrorist attacks making mali in the words of secretary clinton a powder keg of instability. the u.n. security council will vote in coming weeks authorizing military intervention by the african union. other interventions have provided a model for multi lateral that allow the united states and our allies to provide operational support without boots on the ground. this intervention will take time and stability cannot be restored through military action alone. this is governance and security. the long-running grievances of the political vacuum in the south must be addressed through diplomacy and rebuilding democratic institutions and government. any agreement that attempts to peel off groups currently aligned will require a credible government to do so. elections are the key to not only resolving and restoring assistance but for reclaiming control of the north and democracy. >> while challengeses cannot be addressed as the u.n. secretary general's report suggested, the international community must address these crises at the same time and move forward with elections that might exclude p
option that by god u.n. after. and here i have to agree with ros. somebody with a big man with a backside if you're president of the united states can achieve a great deal. >> thank you very much. >> thank you all very much. can't knock [inaudible conversations] >> y aerators institute? >> i think the writers institute is something that's very important within the culture. we are a culture of words, a voice says. words are key to our imagination , our capacity to envision things. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page sensei's of writing, but i think there's no other art form so utterly sensible than perhaps film, which we work with, too. but there is that thing in literature it just captures the human spirit. >> commander of the u.s. military operation in the pacific, admiral samuel locklear spoke with pentagon reporters about north korea's plan to launch a satellite figure this one in violation of two u.n. security resolutions. he also talked about china's decision to the aircraft carrier in the obama administration shifted À la terry resources for the pacific region
a joint u.n. afghan base. it happened in eastern afghanistan. there are no immediate reports of any casualties. the taliban is claiming responsibility for the attack. joining me now by phone from kabul is journalist ben farmer. ben, the attack is being described as, quote, complex. can you walk us through what happened? >> well, it does seem to be complex and ambitious. it began at about 6:00 local time this morning, just after dawn. it began with two suicide car bomb attacks, attacking the gate of the airfield. the vehicles were packed with explosives and driven towards the gate and detonated. followed a wave of suicide attackers armed with assault rifles, some also wearing suicide vests. they started to attack the gate guards and guards on the walls. it was a two-hour fire fight. during that fire fight, helicopters took off from the airfield to join in the battle to fire down on the attackers. the fire fight took about two hours, at the end of which all the attackers were dead. we believe there were about nine in total, including those in the suicide car bombs. now, the coalition
the meeting with the u.n. ambassador rice. >> i continue to be troubled by the fact that the u.n. ambassador decided to play what was essentially a political role. >> we're significantly troubled by many of the answers that we got and some that we didn't get. >> the concerns i have are greater today than they were before. >> i got to say, cokie, i was surprised by all that. usually you don't go to a meeting like that unless you have an idea of how it's going to turn out. >> it is surprising. what we're dealing with, to some degree, something that dan was just talking about, that republicans, particularly senator graham, are more worried about their primaries than their general elections and there is some amount of trying to prove your conservative credentials here. and i think that senator graham has been out there on issues like immigration and other issues where conservatives aren't with him. to go the attack on ambassador rice -- >> it's not just senator graham. it's susan collins, a moderate from maine, who introduced susan rice at her combination hearing. it's bob corker. very much a mo
of the architects that designed the u.n. headquarters in new york, a project that began in 1947. in 1956, niemeyer created a series of landmark structures for brazil's new capital city of brasilia. these include the national congress, the presidential palace, the cathedral, and the contemporary art museum. the entire city of brasilia was later designated a unesco world heritage site. niemeyer was noted for his inventive curving designs. the architect continued working until his 100th birthday. he succumbed to a lung infection at a hospital in his home city of rio de janeiro on wednesday. >>> typhoon bopha is now moving off the philippines. meteorologist robert speta has been following the storm. robert, tell us the latest. >>> well, right now the storm is out over the south china sea, so good news here. the center of circulation continuing to meander off here towards the west, and it does look like it's going to be remaining in place. and actual through intensity in the long range may just be very well winding down out over the open ocean here so, very good news as far as that. but still some mois
profile opponents and former head of the u.n.'s nuclear regulatory agency. >> we will continue to push until we get a proper develop a institution. >> what is the key question? >> i think the key question is, is morsi's presidency in nature. and you have strong forces against him. everyone is united against him. >> behind him is the muslim brotherhood. and lately there is an indication apparently the armed forces protected him at the palace. if you get the muslim brotherhood and the armed forces behind him, he stays in power. >> there are now morsi's people. so the army is going to support him because he has put in all of his people to run the army. >> ryan? >> not all of his people and the armed forces are still somewhat aligned with the judiciary which is also packed with mubarek era people. morsi has taken them on. but seeing the reformers in the street is almost a hopeful sign. in a sense that they are assured -- having watched what happened to mubarek, i think morsi has got to be concerned. he has got to find some way to let a little air out of this balloon. but the fact that he h
that and also said that he was going to, was supporting a u.n. treaty on arms, which just hours after he was elected and at the united nations signed and that dnot rep and bear arms and the united states would be signing on to a worldwide treaty with countries like syria and iran, in which would water down our right to bare arms. >> i noticed there was a spike in gun sales after the election, why is that? >> well, because of those things and president obama's history and the first term of regulations and executive orders, things like that to try to restrict guns, so, people are want to get guns and may be restricted and worried about government having guns and they reported that black friday was the single biggest sale of firearms in the history this have country and november was the single biggest for gun sales. >> mike: over the last 11 months in this country a new study came out. 2.5 million times in in country over the last 11 months, crimes have been prevented because of guns. >> where does the anti-gun group get it wrong? >> it was exactly, bob costas said. i think he actually sai
sclinten a powder keg of instability in the region and beyond. the u.n. security council will likely vote authorizing a military intervention. similar african led super vention have provided a model for multilateral and regionly led solutions that allow the united states and our allies to provide operational support without putting boots on the ground. this will take time and stability cannot be restored through military action alone. the situation in malli is as much a crisis of governance as of security. the long running grievances between the north and the south must be addressed through diplomacy, rebuilding democratic institutions the restoration of democratically elected government. any agreement that tends to peel off groups aligned will require a credible government to do so. elections are the key to not only resolving and restoring now frozen assistance but reclaiming government control of the north and restoring the nearly three decade long history of democracy. the challenges cannot be addressed as separate issues as the recent report suggested. the international community must
to do what they would call a peaceful satellite launch. we believe it is still in contradictory to the u.n. security council resolutions that because of the nature of the type of missile that they'll be firing and the implications it has for ballistic missile type of activity somewhere down the road and the destabilizing impact that will have on the security environment throughout the region not just on the peninsula. >> [inaudible] from cnn. >> can you -- [inaudible] what's your assessment? they say they've solved whatever problems they had with their april failed launch. what have you seen, what's your assessment, how could they have solved the problems? who might have helped them? do you see iran in there possibly helping them? who else? and do you think he's doing this in response to hard liners in his own government? why would he be doing this? >> well, i think the professed reason is to probably do it in conjunction with the anniversary on the 17th which is widely reported in the paper, in the newspapers. but, you know, my -- our assessment is that their desire to continue down this
of human rights abuses in iran. i would just read very briefly from the report that the u.n. special rapporteur for iran files with the u.s. assembly september 20th 11 in the repertoire highlighted a pattern of systemic violations of human rights. iran has refused access to the united nations special rapporteur on human rights for for several years now. september 2011 the u.n. general submitted a report in which he said he was deeply troubled by reports of increased numbers of executions come amputations, arbitrary arrest and detention, unfair trials, torture and ill-treatment in a crackdown on human rights activists, lawyers, an opposition that exists. just to draw one prefix ample from the weeks news, there is actually a guess what qualifies in iran briefly is good news, a well-known human rights lawyer ended her 49 day hunger strike on december 4th. her name is nazarene to show day. she has been imprisoned in prison since 20 tenanted machine had imposed a travel ban on her has been an-year-old daughter, sushi was on a hunger strike for 49 days and has actually stopped the hunger s
violation of a u.n. security council resolution, and we encourage the leadership in north korea to consider what they are doing here and implications in the overall security environment on the korean peninsula, as well as destination. >> anything new? we been hearing some rumblings for some time that there might be some activity on that front. anything new that you can provide in terms of insights into launches or things like that? >> well, i think you're tracking a pretty well. i think from the media today there are indications declared indications of their intention to do what they would call a peaceful satellite launch. and we believe it is in contradictory to the u.n. security council resolutions, that because of the nature of the type of missile they will be firing and the implications it has for ballistic missile type of activity somewhere down the road, and the destabilizing impact that will have on security incitement throughout the throughout the region, not just on the peninsula. >> can you follow up on some of -- was short assessment? they say they have solve whatever problems th
can't wait to see what that is going to be. given the propensity the u.n. can get it fixed if he does use chemical weapons we will send him a letter. if that doesn't work a strongly worded letter and if that doesn't work, we will send him a really strongly worded letter with all of the words in bold type. you know the tragedy is the president promised us he understood people in these muslim countries and they would listen to him in a way they didn't listen to previous presidents. how is that working out for us? it is not working out at all. egypt is a mess, syria is in civil war between 40 50,000 people killed by its own government. problems in tunisia. problems still remaining in afghanistan and that corrupt government. i am still waiting to find out what it is that we are going to do that scares iran enough to shut down the nuclear program. in the meantime are we putting any real muscle on these crazy mad men? no demanding israel to stop bed rins. i think somehow we are missing something. i think we put more pressure on crazy governments building nuclear devices and releasing gas on
by the plo which recently after four years of not negotiating with the us rail ris went to the u.n. and asked for upgraded status. do the israelis have anyone to negotiability a peace process with at this point, and if they didn't negotiate, and let's suppose that abbas came tomorrow to negotiate these process after four years of refusing to do so without concessions in advance, could he sign a pape or that would be at all -- a paper that would be at all meaningful? would he be able to bring hamas into it which is dedicate today the extermination of israel? is there any way to believe that israel could have a separate peace or have peace for the -- before the rest of the world settles this mess with islamism? >> well, it's possible, but it's very hard at this point to imagine. it would not come easily for all the questions, for all the reasons that your questions embody. i mean, in the first place, um, right now israel faces a palestinian people that are divided between two governments. so making peace with one wouldn't give them the security or the confidence to take the risks that they will
of the hour. >> alisyn: right to the headlines, new overnight, between the u.n. and afghanistan air base under attack. and car bombs went off at the gates of the american helicopters firing at the attackers and the taliban has claimed responsibility for this and n.a.t.o. says an afghan security officer was killed and local officers say five civilians were killed. did not make it past the gates. the tragic story this morning, a nfl player shoots and kills his girlfriend before turning the gun on himself. jovan belcher shot and killed his 22-year-old girlfriend in their home and belcher's mother and three month old daughter in another room and he then drove to the chiefs practice facility and met up with the head coach and general manager there before turning away and taking his own life in front of them. >> if you can take your worst nightmare and then put somebody that you know and love into that situation a give them a gun and stand three feet away from them and watch them kill themselves, that's what it's like. it's unfathomable. >> police did not release a motive, but he and his girlfriend
.s. assistance to undercut, must not continue to undercut our key interest in the region. second, the u.n. should consider initiating security cooperation to linwood training and intelligence sharing with heavily vetted opposition groups that are committed to the space process and universally accepted human rights and human rights principles. i understand organizations like the syrian support could have developed criteria and secure commitments from commanders on the ground to abide by the internationally accepted human rights norms and conventions relative to the behavior during armed conflict. we should make sure that if we take this step we ensure that that happens. third of the u.s. should consider measures that would hamper the ability of the syrian air force to conduct aerial attacks on civilians. the finalize the patriot missile batteries which is an important step in the right direction. while defensive in nature of things that these batteries are an important display of international solidarity with turkey and the syrian people. the administration should also examine and assess other way
conference in ireland. the special u.n. envoy to syria was at the meeting said they agreed to seek a, quote, creative solution to the syrian crisis. jim miklaszewski joins us with the latest. let's talk about the information that nbc reported regarding the syrian military and its actions right now. >> to be clear the precursor of chemicals or at least a couple that actually when combined chemically create that deadly nerve gas. we've been told by u.s. sources those precursor chemicals have been preloaded now into aerial bombs that could be dropped from the fighter bombers onto the syrian people. as of this afternoon there is still no indication that the syrians have actually put -- attempted to put those weapons on aircraft or that there's been a final fatal order from president assad to carry out any kind of attack. so it appears right now that they are in at least the preparation mode, but they're really just one step away from actually carrying out those chemical weapons attacks. we heard secretary panetta say today that the latest intelligence on what's going on with those chemical weap
of mali, to our allies, and to our security. the u.n. security council is now considering what they call a concept of operations for an african-led military operation. the u.s. can and should play a more active role in supporting this and preventing the country from becoming a permanent home for extremists and a safe haven for terrorists. an active role, mr. president, does not mean putting american boots on the ground. instead, we can provide operational support for a regionally led, multilateral, african-led force being organized by eco was, the economic community of west african states, and the african union. in the weeks ahead, the u.n. security council will likely vote on a resolution authorizing this coalition to lead a military intervention to dislodge the terrorists in the northern. we've seen models like this wo work, in cote d'ivoire and somalia, so there's reason to believe in the potential of a regional military solution to the security crisis in the north. however, even if this intervention works, it will take time to train and equip and assemble the regional force and to de
made it very clear at the u.n. general assembly where the israeli red line is. but there is an argument that there is no american red line, there is an american invisible line, and no one is sure where it is. not the iranians, not us, not the israelis. do you share that concern? is there anything we can do to establish a more conclusive and defined redline so that it helps us in our negotiating strategy with the iranians? as we were reminded this morning, persians negotiate in the bazaar. do we have an america that we can more clearly defined -- american red line that we can more clearly define? >> there are a couple of reasons by the military threat is important. as sandy indicated, the iranians to respond to credible threats of force. -- do respond to credible threats of force. if you read the biographies of the hostage-takers, they said they were afraid ronald reagan was going to act like a cowboy. the release the hostages the minute he was sworn in. the soviets threatened to bomb tehran, and the hostages were let go. it is important to note that the iran-iraq war came to win and win
years we have never received any claim from the republic of china, and after the u.n. report, they changed his position on this subject to claim the island. today, i don't want to get into the details of the island. this is forum and just have global nervous. but i'd like to point, you know, the audience to the two elements. this is not -- in south china sea, china is trying to advance. with the philippines and vietnam and other countries. they claim the islands at least in south china sea. east china sea there is an issue with japan. and from japan, -- [inaudible] the taiwan, the philippines, this is called -- from the viewpoint of china. violence exists in the pacific. china openly express their strong interest in the maritime security and also the territory along those islands. so these china sea, this is not isolated when. this is a kind of china military strategy to advance. >> that's an important point. which are basically saying this is about power. and a powerful which china is going to become more powerful. they are powerful to write history. we write history. you ar
to the middle east. good to have you guys, too. >> great to have you here. so baseline recognized by the u.n. what does it mean? >> the palestinians got frustrated by a lack of a process. we have to get that back to a kr credible location. >> and the obama administration is saying what the united nations did unilaterally was a setback. do you agree with that? the body i represent is split. some people are in favor of the u.s. vote. the truth of it, the only thing that will work to deliver a palestinian state side-by-side with a secure state of israel is peace. as you can see we have a chance now. the president has been re-elected. i know he's deeply personally committed to this and we just have to regrip it, i'm afraid. >> what's gone wrong? >> it's partly because there's so much turmoil in the region right now. it's how each side views its own prospects. >> how would you characterize a credible negotiation given the fact as long as we've been alive there's been these problems that keep erupting and never, ever get solved? we've been trying for 20, 30 years. it was 50, 60 years before we got
, moscow's support in places like the u.n. security council, the iranians are very worried about upsetting russia's interests in the south caucuses. this is best reflected by iran's position in regards to armenia and georgia where russian interests are strongest. i have provided more detail in my testimony and provided some examples. second, i think we have a failure in tehran's so-called big brother approach which i think is heavily tainted with an ideological syndrome. so i would quickly say it's not just that iran doesn't want to be active in the south caucuses because it fears that the russians might be upset, but it's also because of a failure of its model as a political invitation that is extended over the last 20 years to these three countries, particularly azerbaijan. where russian interests are least sensitive n my view, iran has also failed to gain traction. this is thanks to -- excuse me. where iran has basically insisted on sharing its anti-american and aunt-western portions, and this is a call which the authorities in azerbaijan have repeatedly rejected, i think they would hav
that is occurring and they're now too afraid to return. u.n. secretary general ban ki moon visited this refugee camp in jordan, this is yesterday, and or own cnn's ivan watson is in a sprawling refugee camp on the border with turkey. >> reporter: we're in a camp of around 7,000 syrians on the edge of syria. these people, some of them have been waiting a month, two months to be allowed into turkey. turkey says its refugee camps are full right now. these people have been supplied tents. they get about two meals, hot meals, a day, but everybody here complains that the water is seeping into their tents, and none of these tents really have heat either, so you can see how people are trying to heat up their tea and water, making fires right outside these shelters. now, this is just a fraction of the hoards of people who have been displaced by the conflict in syria. we don't really know the numbers of displaced people inside syria. the united nations says close to half a million have been pushed outside of the country to neighboring countries, like iraq, lebanon, turkey, jordan. the united nations secretary
for syria back on track, a u.n. effort that's stalled for so many months now. there's not a lot of hope it will get back on track anytime soon. a lot of international powers and pressure being put on syria to try to comply with some sort of peace plan so this nightmare scenario doesn't come to any sort of fruition. zoraida? >> all right, we're talking about a deadly nerve gas, it is sarin. can you tell us what kind of damage could this do to the people there? >> reporter: it's well known that sarin and the use of sarin is a nightmare scenario. the use of it could kill a huge amount of people in a very short amount of time. now, last night, a former cia officer, robert bear, was speaking to anderson cooper. he described what the use of sarin could do. here's more of what he had to say. >> one round and the dispersion on that could be -- depends on the wind -- but you could take out, let's say a city like homs, you could take out a third of the city in the first couple of hours. anderson, this is a highly toxic liquid. it's a persistent agent. it's absolutely completely deadly. >> reporte
in benghazi. take a listen. >> susan rice has done a great job as our u.n. ambassador. she has been a stalwart colleague in a lot of the tough decisions that we've had to make. and certainly with respect to defending our national interests and national security at the united nations. >> so clinton is also going to testify on benghazi next week. what are the politics of all of this for secretary clinton? and are there risks for her here? >> i don't think there are necessarily risks for her here as long as she stays out of the whole fray of susan rice and congressional republicans. there's an awful lot going on on that score, but i tnk hillary clinton may be able to keep herself above all that. by the way, we keep expecting the white house for this rice situation to be resolved. we fully expect president clinton to make -- excuse me, president obama to make his announcement about his national security team any day now. >> what do you hear with regards to that, david? are you hearing that susan race is going -- susan rice is going to get the nod or that the waters are shark infested and -- >> com
-american lyrics in 2004. text of the lyrics refsurfaced n lyric's ireport calling for the death of u.s. soldiers. psy wrote the controversial lyrics. he did write them. another south korean rock band penned the words for their song "dear america" but psy was one of three performers rapping the lyrics on stage. he did write them or he did not write them? he did not write them. okay. so he did it on stage. let's bring in dean obeidallah in los angeles. we did our moment of the week first because you were having problems with your earpiece. it's live tv. you have an issue. it's not a big deal. it works, all right? >> exactly. >> dean on the phone and on tv, should he be held accountable for another band's lyrics he rapped back in 2004 or are people orr reacting about artistic freedom? >> honestly if he had not apologized, if he stood up for those lyrics and that's what he really still feels now, that american troops should be killed, people are right by protesting. time has passed. he said he's performed for the u.s. troops. he's sincerely apologetic. some will forgive him and some will not. those
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